Saturday, March 21, 2009

Photographic documentation of Nazi crimes

[Last updated on 04.02.2011 due to broken links in section 1.]

[Last updated on 07.03.2014 to add a photo credit note.] 

The photographs shown hereafter, some of which are not recommended for more sensitive people, show victims of the genocide of the Jews, and of other nazi crimes addressed in various articles on this blog. I tried to collect photos that are less well known, regarding nazi crimes in Eastern Europe, especially in Poland and in the occupied territories of the Soviet Union.

The captions embedded in the link to each photo are the captions provided by the source featuring the respective photo. Where these captions are not written in English, I provided a translation of the caption, with supplementary information if considered necessary. Photos shown directly in the blog can be enlarged by clicking on them.



1. Photographs available on the Internet

1.1 Photographs from the archives of the Ghetto Fighters House



Photos should be credited to: 
The Ghetto Fighters' House Museum/Israel/ The Photo Archive

1.1.1 A body in a mass grave at the Ponary mass extermination site near Vilnius (Vilna).


1.1.2 A Jew burying bodies in a mass grave in the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw.


1.1.3 A Jewish gravedigger laying bodies in a mass grave in the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw.


1.1.4 A mass grave containing the bodies of Janowska camp inmates


1.1.5 A mass grave discovered in Iwje, Poland


1.1.6 A mass grave in Drobitski Yar near Kharkov.


1.1.7 A mass grave in Drobitski Yar near Kharkov.


1.1.8 A mass grave in the Jewish cemetery in Warsaw.


1.1.9 A mass grave of Lenin Jewry (in the Polesye region, on the Russo - Polish border)


1.1.10 A Soviet investigating committee beside a mass grave of the Jews of Kozin, which they excavated.


1.1.11 Bodies in a mass grave


1.1.12 Bodies of Jews exhumed from a mass grave in an unidentified ghetto in Poland


1.1.13 Bodies taken from a mass grave in Taganrov, Russia


1.1.14 Bones and skulls that were exposed in a mass grave


1.1.15 Corpses exhumed from a mass grave and laid out in rows


1.1.16 Corpses exhumed from mass graves and laid out in rows


1.1.17 Corpses exhumed from mass graves at the Ponary mass extermination site near Vilnius (Vilna)


1.1.18 German soldiers shooting Jews who are still alive in a mass grave in Vinnitsa, USSR


1.1.19 German soldiers standing amid the bodies lying in the mass grave in Vinnitsa, Ukraine


1.1.20 The bodies of Jews from the Zolochev (Zloczow) ghetto, in a mass grave


1.1.21 The bodies of Jews from the Zolochev (Zloczow) ghetto, exhumed from a mass grave after the liberation


1.1.22 The bodies of Jews from the Zolochev (Zloczow) ghetto, exhumed from a mass grave after the liberation.


1.1.23 The bodies of Jews in an unidentified ghetto, exhumed from a mass grave


1.1.24 The bodies of women killed by the German army, in a mass grave in Kerch


1.1.25 The bones of Jews exhumed from a mass grave at Utena (Utian), Lithuania


1.1.26 The excavation of mass graves at the Ponary mass extermination site near Vilnius (Vilna) in July 1944


1.1.27 The execution of civilians at the edge of a mass grave in the USSR


1.1.28 The exhumation of a mass grave in the city of Bialystok


1.1.29 A family in the USSR killed by the Germans


1.1.30 A family in the USSR killed by the Germans


1.1.31 A gallows on which six men were hanged


1.1.32 A gallows with the bodies of ten Polish civilians


1.1.33 A German soldier beside a gallows upon which seven men have been hanged


1.1.34 A German soldier beside the bodies of Yugoslav civilians hanged on an improvised gallows between two trees in a forest


1.1.35 A German soldier in the Krakow ghetto, standing beside the bodies of Jews laid out in a row


1.1.36 A Lithuanian armed with an iron bar, who took part in the pogrom in Kaunas (Kovno), posing beside the bodies of Jews.


1.1.37 A man in uniform, posing for a photo amid the corpses at a mass murder site


1.1.38 A mass extermination site on the grounds of a cemetery


1.1.39 A pile of bodies, apparently of POWs, in Helmeu, Romania


1.1.40 A pile of bodies on a pallet in the Warsaw ghetto


1.1.41 A row of bodies, apparently photographed in a POW camp


1.1.42 A row of gallows on which Soviet hostages were hanged by the German army


1.1.43 A Russian woman beside the body of her husband who was killed by the SS in Gerasimov, a village in the Rostov area


1.1.44 A wagon loaded with the bodies of murdered Jews, with an armed German soldier standing beside it


1.1.45 Armed Lithuanian militiamen beside the bodies of Kaunas (Kovno) Jews murdered in the pogrom that took place with the entry of the Germans


1.1.46 Bodies at a mass extermination site


1.1.47 Bodies at a mass murder site in Poland


1.1.48 Bodies at the Ponary mass extermination site near Vilnius (Vilna)


1.1.49 Bodies at the Ponary mass extermination site near Vilnius (Vilna)


1.1.50 Bodies of Jews in the Budapest ghetto


1.1.51 Bodies of Soviet POW's killed by the Germans


1.1.52 Carting away bodies in the Warsaw ghetto


1.1.53 Collecting the bodies of victims in the Birkenau camp


1.1.54 Fifteen Polish civilians hanged on a gallows in Radom


1.1.55 Five men who were hanged on electricity poles on a street in a town in the East


1.1.56 Five Yugoslav men, hanged on suspicion of supporting the partisans


1.1.57 German soldiers beside a gallows with four Yugoslav men hanged in Krusevac, Yugoslavia


1.1.58 German soldiers beside the bodies of Jews in the Borislav ghetto


1.1.59 German soldiers beside the bodies of Yugoslav civilians killed in Pancevo


1.1.60 German soldiers in a POW camp, standing beside bodies laid out in a row


1.1.61 German soldiers looking at the bodies of Jews hanged on a tree in the area of Lvov


1.1.62 German soldiers standing beside the bodies of Jews at the Jajinci extermination site near Beograd (Belgrade)


1.1.63 German soldiers standing beside the body of a Jew whom they beat to death


1.1.64 Human remains uncovered in the Kaunas (Kovno) ghetto after the war


1.1.65 Jews loading bodies onto a wagon, apparently in the Treblinka camp


1.1.66 Jews standing on the verge of a pit at the extermination site in Liepaja, Latvia


1.1.67 Jews who were shot during an aktion (mass roundups for deportation) in the Wegrow ghetto in May 1943


1.1.68 The remains of Jewish victims in the Sajmiste (Zemun) extermination camp in Beograd (Belgrade)


1.1.69 The area of the crematorium in the Majdanek camp


1.1.70 The remains of corpses incinerated in the Majdanek camp's crematorium


1.1.71 The remains of corpses incinerated in the Majdanek camp's crematorium


1.1.72 The bodies and partial remains of victims of the Majdanek camp


1.1.73 A heap of bones and ashes of victims of the Majdanek camp


1.1.74 A pile of bones and skulls of people killed in the Majdanek camp


1.1.75 A pile of bones and skulls of people killed in the Majdanek camp


1.1.76 The skulls of victims of the Majdanek camp


1.1.77 A pile of bones of victims in the Majdanek camp


1.1.78 The skulls and bones of Belzec camp victims, brought to a bunker on the grounds of the camp


1.1.79 Human skeletal remains in the Treblinka camp


1.1.80 Piles of skulls and bones in the yard of the Anatomical Institute in Wrzeszcz Regarding this photo see Dr. Neander’s comment of Thursday, September 17, 2009 10:54:00 PM.


1.1.81 The skulls and bones of camp inmates, in the Anatomical Institute in Wrzeszcz Regarding this photo see Dr. Neander’s comment of Thursday, September 17, 2009 10:54:00 PM.


1.1.82 Soviet Red Army officers standing beside a pile of human ashes in the Majdanek camp


1.1.83 A pile of ashes of victims of the Majdanek camp that were used to fertilize the surrounding fields


1.1.84 Heaps of ashes on the grounds of the Treblinka camp


1.1.85 A heap of ashes in the Treblinka camp


1.2 Photographs from the archives of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

1.2.1 USHMM 32165 An undertaker views a layer of corpses laid out at the bottom of a mass grave in the Okopowa Street cemetery


1.2.2 USHMM 32168 A boy working in the Warsaw ghetto cemetery drags a corpse to the edge of the mass grave where it will be buried


1.2.3 USHMM 32271 An undertaker in the Warsaw ghetto cemetery on Okopowa Street displays an open coffin that contains the body of woman


1.2.4 USHMM 69982 A cart filled with corpses of Jews who died in the Warsaw ghetto, awaiting mass burial at the Jewish cemetery


1.2.5 USHMM 69998 Laborers at the Jewish cemetery on Okopowa Street bury bodies in a mass grave


1.2.6 USHMM 50178 A mass grave in which the corpses of Soviet POWs are being buried


1.2.7 USHMM 66702 The bodies of five civilians executed by German forces hang from the balcony of a building in an unidentified city


1.2.8 USHMM 66703 The bodies of six civilians hang from the balcony of a school on Sverdlov Street where they were executed by German troops of the 50th Army Corps


1.2.9 USHMM 73459 S. Afansyeva from Kerch mourns the death of her 18-year-old son, who was shot by Germans when they were forced to evacuate the city in February 1942


1.2.10 USHMM 89063 Men with an unidentified unit execute a group of Soviet civilians kneeling by the side of a mass grave


1.2.11 USHMM 26951 Lithuanians and a Soviet officer stand among the remains of twenty Jewish atrocity victims, who were exhumed from a mass grave in the woods near Utena


1.2.12 USHMM 30857 Jewish survivors stand in an opened mass grave among the exhumed bodies of the victims of a mass shooting in Biala Podlaska


1.2.13 USHMM 47624 Soviet soldiers observe recently burned corpses stacked on sawed lumber on the grounds of the Klooga concentration camp


1.2.14 USHMM 47625 Close-up of corpses killed in the Klooga concentration camp


1.2.15 USHMM 47626 Corpses lie on the grounds of the Klooga concentration camp


1.2.16 USHMM 47627 Burned corpses lie on the grounds of the Klooga concentration camp


1.2.17 USHMM 47629 Postwar view of burned corpses in the Klooga concentration camp


1.2.18 USHMM 50608 Corpses in Klooga stacked for burning


1.2.19 USHMM 59485 The partially burned corpses of former inmates are lined up on the ground at the Klooga concentration camp


1.2.20 USHMM 59486 The partially burned corpses of former inmates are lined up on the ground at the Klooga concentration camp


1.2.21 USHMM 59487 The partially burned corpses of former inmates are lined up on the ground at the Klooga concentration camp


1.2.22 USHMM 71947 The charred remains of prisoners burned by the Germans before the liberation of the Maly Trostinets concentration camp


1.2.23 USHMM 71950 The charred remains of prisoners burned by the Germans before the liberation of the Maly Trostinets concentration camp


1.2.24 USHMM 71956 A member of a Soviet investigating team views the remains of Jewish victims burned in a barn by the Germans near the Maly Trostinets concentration camp


1.2.25 USHMM 71958 View of the charred remains of Jewish victims burned by the Germans in the Maly Trostinets concentration camp


1.2.26 USHMM 71959 View of the charred remains of Jewish victims burned in a barn by the Germans near the Maly Trostinets concentration camp


1.2.27 USHMM 85805 Soviet soldiers exhume a mass grave in Lvov


1.2.28 USHMM 86588 Soviets exhume a mass grave in Zloczow shortly after the liberation


1.3 Photographs of last traces of the Treblinka extermination camp

1.3.1 TURNED UP EARTH #1. The photo was taken by Soviet Forces (Novosti Press), during their investigations in 1945.

1.3.2 TURNED UP EARTH #2. Bones, pieces of clothes and thousands of personal belongings of the victims were digged out by the local population when they searched for valuables. The photo was taken in 1945.

1.3.3 TURNED UP EARTH #3. The photo was taken in 1945.

1.3.4 TURNED UP EARTH #4. The photo was taken in 1945.

1.3.5 HUMAN REMNANTS AND BELONGINGS #1. The photo was taken in 1945.

1.3.6 HUMAN REMNANTS AND BELONGINGS #2. The photo was taken in 1945.

1.3.7 HUMAN REMNANTS AND BELONGINGS #3. The photo was taken in 1945.

1.4 Photographs included in The Babi Yar Album

1.4.1 Remains of shoes and clothes of the Babi Yar victims. Photo: Special Commission 1943

1.4.2 The Syretskij concentration camp. The corpses were dug out of a trash pit. Photo: Special Commission 1943

1.4.3 The Syretskij concentration camp. The corpses dug out of trash pit. Photo: Special Commission 1943

1.4.4 The Syretskij concentration camp. The body was dug out of a pit. Photo: Special Commission 1943

1.4.5 The Syretskij concentration camp. The bodies were dug out of pits. Photo: Special Commission 1943

1.4.6 The Syretskij concentration camp. The body was dug out of a pit. Photo: Special Commission 1943

2. Photographs scanned from the printed sources mentioned hereafter

2.1 Karel C. Berkhoff, Harvest of Despair. Life and Death in Ukraine under Nazi Rule, 2004 The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusets and London, England


2.1.1 Open mass grave with thousands of Jews. Podolian town of Proskuriv (today Khmelnytsky), 1941 or 1942 (Muzeum Wojska Polskiego, courtesy of United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Photo Archives, 17781)

2.2 Museum Berlin-Karlshorst, Erinnerungen an einen Krieg (publication of the Museum Berlin-Karlshorst, Berlin, Germany)

Sprengung eines Dorfes in partisanenverdächtigem Gebiet, Weißrußland, 1944

2.2.1: Blowing up of a village in a region suspect of partisan activity, Belorussia, 1944

Massenexekution an 2800 lettischen Juden am Skede-Strand in Liepaja, 15. bis 17.12.1941. Zwischen dem 15. und 17.12.1941 wurden 2800 Juden aus Liepaja am Skede-Strand von deutschen SS-Angehörigen und litauischen Hilfspolizisten erschossen.

2.2.2: Mass execution of 2,800 Latvian Jews on the Skede beach in Liepaja, 15 to 17.12.1941. Between 15 and 17.12.1941, 2,800 Jews were shot on the Skede beach by German SS-members and Lithuanian auxiliary policemen.

Erhängte Partisanen, 1941 bis 1944. Zur Abschreckung wurden Partisanen wie auch Unterstützer von Partisanen öffentlich aufgehängt und mit einem Schild um den Hals „Wir haben auf Deutsche geschossen“, „Ich habe Partisanen unterstützt“ hängengelassen.

2.2.3: Hanged partisans, 1941 to 1944. As a deterrent partisans as well as partisan supporters were hanged in public and left hanging with signboards around their necks, on which phrases like "We fired upon Germans" or "I supported partisans" were written.

9.1.2 – 9.1.4 Sowjetische Kriegsgefangene im Stalag XD 310 Wietzendorf, 1941/42. Die Kriegsgefangenenlager in der Lüneburger Heide (Wietzendorf, Bergen-Belsen und Oerbke) waren auf ehemaligen Truppenübungsplätzen untergebracht. Die Lebensbedingungen waren katastrophal. Bis zum Februar 1942 starben 90 % der Gefangenen.
9.1.5 Kriegsgefangenenlager Oerbke, Niedersachsen. Der eingezäunte Platz im Vordergrund war zur Sammlung von Kriegsgefangenen vorgesehen, die in ein Konzentrationslager überwiesen wurden.


2.2.4: 9.1.2 – 9.1.4 Soviet prisoners of war in Stalag XD 310 Wietzendorf, 1941/42. The POW camps in the Luneburg Heath (Wietzendorf, Bergen-Belsen e Oerbke) were installed in former military training fields. The living conditions were catastrophic. 90 % of the prisoners died until February 1942.
9.1.5 POW camp of Oerbke, Lower Saxony. The área surrounded by barbed wire in the foreground served to collect prisoner of war who were transferred to a concentration camp.

2.3 »Gott mit uns« Der deutsche Vernichtungskrieg im Osten 1939 – 1945. Document collection, edited by Ernst Klee e Willi Dressen, 1989 S. Fischer Verlag GmbH, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

Polen. Erschießung eines Priesters

2.3.1: Poland. A priest is shot.

Polen. Männer graben ihr eigenes Grab.
Polen. Erschießung durch volksdeutschen Selbstschutz.


2.3.2: Poland. Men digging their own grave.
Poland. Execution by ethnic German self-defense.

Bekanntmachung

2.3.3: Wallpaper with a text in Ucrainian, Russian and German language, which reads as follows: "Announcement. In Kiev a rádio installation was maliciously damaged. As it was not possible to establish the perpetrators, 400 MEN FROM KIEV WERE SHOT.
I communicate this to the population as a warning and again exhort them to immediately inform the posts of the German Wehrmacht and the German police of any suspicious observation, so that such criminals can be rendered harmless as they deserve.
EBERHARD
Major – General and City Commandant
Kiev, 29. XI. 1941"

In deutscher Kriegsgefangenschaft sterben Millionen sowjetischer Soldaten.
Leichenhaufen als Hintergrund für ein Foto-Motiv.


2.3.4: Millions of Soviet soldiers die in German captivity.
Heap of corpses as background for a photograph.

Bilder aus dem Zwangsarbeiterlager in der Janowska-Strasse von Lemberg. Die Häftlinge sind hilflos dem Sadismus ihrer Bewacher ausgeliefert. Kein Anlaß ist zu nichtig, einen Gefangenen zu töten. Ein Orchester muß zum Vergnügen der Lagerfunktionäre aufspielen, auch bei Erschießungen.

2.3.5: Images from the forced labor camp at Yanowska Street in Lemberg. The prisoners are helplessly exposed to the sadism of their guards. No reason is too insignificant to kill a prisoner. An orchestra has to play for the camp functionaries’ amusement, even during shootings.

Ein Kind an der Leiche seiner Mutter, umgekommen in einem KZ für Zivilisten nahe der Ortschaft Ozaritschi

2.3.6: A child by the corpse of its mother, who perished in a concentration camp for civilians near the location of Ozarichi.

Deutsche Soldaten fotografieren massenhaft solche „Motive“. Diese Fotos wurden in sowjetischer Kriegsgefangenschaft unbemerkt fortgeworfen.

2.3.7: German soldiers photographed many such "motives". These photos were discreetly thrown away in Soviet captivity.

Erhängungen.

2.3.8: Hangings.

Sommer 1941: Erschießung „verdächtiger Elemente“ durch eine Wehrmachtseinheit im Mittelabschnitt der Ostfront.

2.3.9: Summer 1941: "Suspicious elements" are shot by a Wehrmacht unit in the central sector of the Eastern Front.

Partisanenbekämpfung aus deutscher Sicht.

2.3.10: Fight against partisans from the German point of view.

Fotos wie von einer Hasenjagd.

2.3.11: Photos like this was a hare hunt.

Drogobytsch in der Ukraine. Arbeiter der Erdölindustrie in Borislaw werden aufgehängt.

2.3.12: Drogobich in Ukraine. Workers of the petroleum industry at Borislav are hanged.

Drogobytsch. Öffentlich erhängte Arbeiter. Die deutsche Besatzungspolitik scheitert an ihrem Rassen- und Vernichtungswahn. Am Ende fehlen die Menschen, die ernten und produzieren. Selbst zunächst deutschfreundliche Ukrainer werden zu erbitterten Feinden.

2.3.13: Drogobich. Workers hanged in public. The German occupation policy fails due to its racial and extermination mania. In the end people to tend the fields and produce are missing. Even initially German-friendly Ukrainians become bitter enemies.

In einer sowjetischen Stadt (Lubny?): Juden auf dem Weg zum Sammelplatz und zu ihrer Erschießung. Sie müssen an herumliegenden Leichen vorübergehen.

2.3.14: In a Soviet city (Lubny?): Jews on their way to the gathering place and to their shooting. They must pass corpses lying along the way.

Sowjetische Juden, unterwegs zur Sammelstelle. Die Leichen an Erschöpfung gestorbener oder Erschossener liegen in aller Öffentlichkeit auf Bürgersteig und Strasse.

2.3.15: Soviet Jews, on their way to the gathering place. The corpses of those who died of exhaustion or were shot are lying in public on the sidewalk and the road.

Panzergraben bei Mogilew, 19.10.1941. Männer, Frauen und Kinder werden von Angehörigen des Polizei-Bataillons 322 mit Lkw herangeschafft. Am rechten Bildrand: Schützen, die in den Panzergraben schießen. (Das Foto wurde vermutlich im Bereich der 1. Kompanie aufgenommen.)

2.3.16: Anti-tank ditch near Mogilev, 19.10.1941. Men, women and children are brought in trucks by members of Police Batallion 322. On the photo's left corner: shooters are shooting into the ditch. (The photo was probably taken in the area of the 1st Company.)

Nach einer Massenerschießung. Ein Angehöriger des Mordkommandos durchwühlt die Habe der Ermordeten.
Zwei Angehörige des Mordkommandos suchen nach Beute.


2.3.17: After a mass shooting. A member of the killer detachment searches the murdered victims' belongings.
Two members of the killer detachment in search of booty.

„Die deutschen Unholde schonten niemanden.“ Der Krieg gegen Geisteskranke und Krüppel

2.3.18: "The German monsters didn’t spare anybody." The war against mentally ill and cripples.

Babi-Yar 1944. Sowjetische Experten an einem geöffneten Massengrab. Zwischen 1941 und 1943 wurden hier zehntausende sowjetischer Bürger erschossen oder erschlagen.

2.3.19: Babi-Yar 1944. Soviet experts by an open mass grave. Between 1941 and 1943 tens of thousands of Soviet citizens were shot or beaten to death here.

Dorogobuzh/Gebiet Smolensk am 5.9.1943: Frauen versuchen, ihre Angehörigen zu identifizieren.

2.3.20: Dorogobush/Smolensk region on 5.9.1943: women try to identify their relatives.

In der Nähe des ukrainischen Dorfes Petrikowo/bei Tarnopol. Eine sowjetische Untersuchungskommission vor den exhumierten Leichen erschossener Zivilisten.

2.3.21: Near the Ukrainian village of Petrikovo/by Tarnopol. Members of a Soviet investigation commission before the exhumed corpses of civilians shot.

Sowjetische Militärärzte untersuchen exhumierte Leichen.

2.3.22: Soviet military medics examine exhumed corpses.

Gerichtsmediziner einer sowjetischen Untersuchungskommission in dem Dorf Polykowitschi nahe Mogilew. Unter den Ermordeten befinden sich auch Säuglinge und Kinder. Zum Vergleich ist im Vordergrund die Leiche eines Erwachsenen hingelegt.

2.3.23: Forensic medicts from a Soviet investigation commission in the village of Polikovichi near Mogilev. Among the people murdered there are also babies and children. For comparison the corpse of an adult was placed in the foreground.

Frauen beim Identifizieren der Leichen von Angehörigen.

2.3.24: Women identifying the corpses of family members.

2.4 Dieter Pohl, Die Herrschaft der Wehrmacht. Deutsche Militärbesatzung und einheimische Bevölkerung in der Sowjetunion 1941 – 1944, 2008 R. Oldenbourg Verlag, Munich, Germany

Massengrab im Durchgangslager Gomel, 1941. (Quelle: Bundesarchiv Ludwigsburg B 162 Bild /862)

2.4.1: Mass grave in the transit camp (for Soviet prisoners of war) of Gomel, 1941. Source: German Federal Archives in Ludwigsburg, B 162 Photo /862.

Durchgangslager Vjaz’ma, November 1941 (Quelle: Stiftung niedersächsische Gedenkstätten Nr. 40627)

2.4.2: Transit camp of Vyaz’ma, November 1941. Source: Foundation Memorial Sites of Lower Saxony.

2.5 Ein Schuld, die nicht erlischt. Dokumente über deutsche Kriegsverbrechen in der Sowjetunion. Document collection, 1987 Pahl Rugenstein Verlag GmbH, Cologne, Germany

Südfront bei Rostow am Don. Auf ihrem Rückzug erschossen die Faschisten die im Gefängnis festgehaltenen Zivilisten. Februar 1943.

2.5.1: Southern front in the area of Rostov on the Don. During their retreat the fascists shot the civilians held in prison. February 1943.

Gestapo-Opfer in Orjol. Die Schlucht, in der die Zivilisten erschossen wurden.

2.5.2: Victims of the Gestapo in Oryol. The gorge where the civilians were shot.

Greueltaten der Besatzer in Weißrußland

2.5.3: Atrocities by the occupiers in Belorussia.

Greueltaten im Gebiet Donezk, Oktober 1943.

2.5.4: Atrocities in the Donezk region, October 1943.

Russische Kinder im „Umsiedlungslager“ bei der Befreiung von Petrosawdsk.

2.5.5: Russian children in a "resettlement camp" at the time of the liberation of Petrosavdsk.

Taganrog. Zu Tode gefolterte Sowjetbürger.

2.5.6: Taganrog. Soviet citizens tortured to death.

Zentralfront bei Konotop. In den ersten Tagen nach der Befreiung dieser Gegen gruben die Bewohner des Dorfes Wargow die Leichen ihrer bestialisch ermordeten Familienangehörigen aus, um sie auf dem Dorffriedhof beizusetzen.

2.5.7: Central front in the area of Konotop. In the first days after the liberation of this region the inhabitans of the village of Vargov dug out the corpses of their bestially murdered relatives, to bury them in the village cemetery.

2.6 Harrison E. Salisbury, The Unknown War, 1978 Bantam Books Toronto – New York – London


2.6.1 Bodies of Jews slaughtered by the Nazis at Babi Yar, Kiev. (The photo probably shows dead inmates of the Syrets concentration camp near Babi Yar. Thanks to Sergey for bringing this to my attention.)

2.7 Article Gorączka złota w Treblince ("Gold Rush in Treblinka"), which appeared on 7 January 2008 in the Polish newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza. The article was translated into German and English (see also the blog Gold Rush in Treblinka.) The embedded captions of the photographs hereafter are from the English translation.

2.7.1 This is no picture from a harvest. Grave robbers from Wólka Okrąglik and neighboring villages pose for a photo together with militiamen who caught them red-handed. In the peasant's pockets there were golden rings and teeth of Jews. At their feet lie skulls and limb bones of those gassed.

2.7.2 Some years after the dissolution of the camp an envoy of the capital's Jewish Historical Commission noted the following: "Human bones and objects are lying around everywhere, in the air there is the stench of decomposing corpses, the local population, which had benefited from trading gold, is robbing each other."

15 comments:

steve said...

Are you sure those German soldiers weren't tortured into posing with dead Jews?

steve said...

Are you sure those German soldiers weren't tortured into posing with dead Jews?

Roberto Muehlenkamp said...

If you think you can offer any evidence that such manipulations happened in regard to any of the pictures in this blog, please fire away. I don't know of any such evidence, and I'd say such manipulations are especially unlikely where crimes reported on and photographed by the Soviets are also mentioned in contemporary German documents and/or by eyewitnesses testifying before West German criminal courts. If you click the label "Soviets" at the end of this article, you will be led to two articles about corroboration of Soviet reports by evidence on which the Soviets could have had no influence.
Not all of the photos in this blog were taken by the Soviets, by the way. Some of them, especially those of hanged partisans or partisan suspects and heaps of bodies in POW camps, were taken by German soldiers.
And many of the photos don't show Jews but non-Jewish victims of Nazi crimes, especially Soviet prisoners of war and Soviet, Polish or Yugoslavian non-Jewish civilians. Given the widespread anti-Semitism among eastern Slavs at the time, there's a good chance that the victims also included Jew-haters like yourself.

Roberto Muehlenkamp said...

PS:
The articles I mentioned are headed "Neither the Soviets nor the Poles have found any mass graves with even only a few thousand bodies …" and "Mass Graves in the Polesie".

Joachim Neander said...
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Joachim Neander said...

Roberto, from the Ghetto Fighters' House collection you should take out both photos showing "skulls and bones" at the "Anatomical Institute in Wrzeszcz." These skulls and bones were taken from the morgue of the Institute and assembled at the end of June 1945 for burial at the nearby cemetery. The Institute was a normal anatomic institute and belonged to the Danzig Medical Academy ("Wrzeszcz" is the name the Poles gave to the Langfuhr neighborhood of Danzig, today Gdansk). Rumors that there was a "human soap factory" led Soviet and Polish investigation commissions in 1945 assume that the bodies in the institute came from Nazi genocide victims, an assumption refuted by Polish authorities in 2006.

Roberto Muehlenkamp said...

Joachim, thanks for the info.

I chose to leave the photos with a reference to your comment.

Ari said...

So many victims were Jewish and so many were not. Maybe it's time to include in the Holocaust remembrance the millions of Russian POW's etc.

Somehow, Nazi atrocity is mostly identified with Jewish genocide, which is true, yet we know that many many others died too.

The Nazis deemed many "undesirable" and murdered them, and of those many were Christian. This fact evades serial holocaust deniers.

Maybe the Russians need to "advertise" more the fate of their POW's who were left to starve and freeze. Estimates are 1-2 million POW's?

Roberto Muehlenkamp said...

Maybe the Russians need to "advertise" more the fate of their POW's who were left to starve and freeze. Estimates are 1-2 million POW's?

More like 3 million.

adam said...

roberto, links to GFH collections are unreachable and must be edited from : http://www.infocenters.co.il/gfh_ ... , to http://lis.infocenters.co.il/gfh/ ...

lynchie3000 said...

Hello, I'm a regular visitor to HC, and I very much admire your work.

If I could just ask you one question. I read your review of Thomas Dalton's Debating the Holocaust on Amazon, you also kindly provided a link to where I could read the first chapter. Which I did.

Dalton claims in footnote number 11: "With one exception: a disputed (dubious) photo of Auschwitz shows a couple dozen corpses, possibly being burned."

I am aware of the photo to which he refers, but on this post you have provided: "1.1.53 Collecting bodies of the victims in the Birkenau camp"

You make no mention in your review of Dalton's error. I just wonder what your opinion is on this.

Regards.

Roberto Muehlenkamp said...

In the blog Old Herrings in a New Can: Thomas Dalton’s Debating the Holocaust (1), I wrote the following regarding Dalton's claim that there are no corpse photos from the extermination camps:

Third, while it is not quite true that there are no corpse photos from the extermination camps – there is at least one Treblinka photo from camp times showing an open mass grave (the stated source is Bundesarchiv No. 183-F0918-0201-011; the Bundesarchiv is the German Federal Archive in Koblenz, Germany), and there are several post-liberation photos of human remains on the sites of the Treblinka and Belzec camps, which are included in my collection of Photographic documentation of Nazi crimes – the scarcity of such photos and of other photos of these camps (like the excavator photos taken by Treblinka's second-in-command Kurt Franz) is due to two facts conveniently omitted by Dalton: the lengths to which the SS went to destroy the corpses and other evidence of the extermination camps, which they were able to do at their leisure long before the Red Army got close to the respective areas, and an express prohibition to take photographs included in a secrecy undertaking that every SS-man detached to one of the Einsatz Reinhard(t) camps had to sign ("I have been thoroughly informed and instructed by SS Hauptstuermfuhrer Hoefle, as Commander of the main division of 'Einsatz Reinhard' of the SS and Police Leader in the District of Lublin: ... that there is an absolute prohibition on photography in the camps of 'Einsatz Reinhard'"). Kurt Franz may have violated this undertaking, but the contents of his private album apprehended when Franz was arrested (some of the photos had been torn out and their captions erased, see Manfred Blank, "Zum Beispiel: Die Ermordung der Juden im 'Generalgouvernement' Polen", in: Adalbert Rückerl, NS-Prozesse. Nach 25 Jahren Strafverfolgung: Möglichkeiten – Grenzen – Ergebnisse, 1971 Verlag C.F. Müller, Karlsruhe, pages 46/47) suggest that he avoided taking photos that clearly showed the nature of the Treblinka extermination camp, perhaps in order to avoid getting into too much trouble in case his illicit activities were discovered. So we can see that there's no reason to consider that anything might be suspect here, except perhaps Mr. Dalton’s qualities as a researcher and/or his intellectual honesty.

Roberto Muehlenkamp said...

The "disputed (dubious)" Auschwitz-Birkenau photo mentioned by "Dalton" (about which there is nothing disputed or dubious outside "Revisionist" cloud-cuckoo-land) is one of the photos shown on page 422 of Pressac's Auschwitz: Technique and Operation of the Gas Chambers.

If you find none of these photos in my collection, that's because I consider them to be well-known. As I wrote at the beginning of this blog, I tried to collect photos that are less well known.

inhistorics said...

Are there any contemporary photographs of the watchtowers at Auschwitz? Irving and others claim the ones at the site today are fakes, reconstructions etc.

ginaunn said...

some sites are real and can help you in research work http://www.unn.edu.ng/library